Spiritual sustenance, naturally.

Posts tagged ‘Wales’

Happy St. David’s Day!

Daffodils, March 1, 2013

Daffodils, March 1, 2013

Daffodil Detail.3.1.13

Daffodil Closeup.3:1:13

Dydd gwyl Dewi Sant Hapus!

Happy Saint Dwynwen’s Day!

Saint Dwynwen is the patron (matron?) saint of lovers and relationships; interesting legends and stories are associated with her. January 25th is the Welsh “Valentine’s Day.” I posted a “Happy St. Dwynwen’s Day” message on Facebook, and a friend asked if I would put it here, so here it is. Check out the Wikipedia link on her: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Dwynwen%27s_Day

Her stories remind us of the mutuality of love, and the pain when love is not reciprocated. Another version of her story can be found in the book Praying with Celtic Holy Women, by Mehan and Oliver.

Before going to sleep tonight, take a few moments to close your eyes, and with your imagination, encircle those close to you with warmth and love. If you are seeking a relationship, feel your heart open as you appreciate the goodness and love you already have in your life. And pay attention to your dreams.

(The above post was formerly published here in 2010.)

 

dydd-santes-dwynwen-hapus

Welsh Ethnobotany and Ethnoecology

Ethnobotany: the study of culturally important species of plants.

Ethnoecology: the study of culturally important ecosystems.

Ned Phillips-Jones offered the above definitions at a workshop my daughter and I attended today on the Ethnobotany and Ethnoecology of Wales. First we gathered for a power-point presentation about the process of using one’s own ethnic background to research and imaginatively explore what plants and animals might have been important to our ancestors. There are close relationships between plants from Wales and plants here in New England: the Welsh rowan and the American mountain ash, for example. My father (whose mother came to this country from Wales) planted mountain ash trees around our home when I was a child – and now I have planted mountain ash at my home. Many plants (rowan, oak, hazel, mistletoe) were considered sacred by ancient Celts. Ned also spoke about coppicing, creating hedges, carved and standing stones, and building cairns. He has been incorporating these methods into his garden project.

The Forest Garden

After the indoor presentation, we proceeded outdoors to the wonderful forest garden that Ned has created on the Hampshire College campus. There we saw hawthorn, blackthorn, elderberry, sloe plum plants, nettle, tiny Welsh daffodils, and many other plants, beautifully arranged in beds with stepping stone paths. We ceremonially planted a holly bush in the garden (the berries on it in the photo below were not real but were there for effect! 🙂 ). It’s a beautiful, peaceful sanctuary of edible delight!

Planting the Holly

Welsh Daffodil

On the social network Americymru, Ned wrote: “A long term goal of mine is to teach Permaculture through the medium of Welsh. I want to help create forest gardens (and teach about them) in order to help struggling communities produce a diversity of foods and useful goods which require little maintenance to produce for years. A number of traditional perennial Welsh wild food crops are promising as contributions to forest garden ecosystems (hazel, gooseberry, wild leek, sea kale and sorrel).
There are strong connections between language, culture, communities, and locally produced food. I believe there is great potential to reinvigorate communities and local economies by investing in perennial agriculture and designed ecosystems. The opportunity for ‘green’ job creation gives the concept added relevance to current policy discussions.”

To finish our time together we enjoyed Herbal Mead, Black Currant Juice, Laver (sea vegetables), and Cawl Mamgu Tregaron (soup).

Gardd bendigedig, Ned! Diolch yn fawr!

Ned Phillips-Jones

St. Patrick was Welsh!

St. Patrick was born Maewyn in Welsh-speaking Britain before he was captured from his rich parents and taken into slavery in Ireland.

He later preached Christianity to the Irish.

Trefoil-shaped Moss, Dorson's Rocks, 5/09

Happy Saint Dwynwen’s Day!

Saint Dwynwen is the patron (matron?) saint of lovers and relationships; interesting legends and stories are associated with her. January 25th is the Welsh “Valentine’s Day.” I posted a “Happy St. Dwynwen’s Day” message on Facebook, and a friend asked if I would put it here, so here it is. Check out the Wikipedia link on her: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Dwynwen%27s_Day

Her stories remind us of the mutuality of love, and the pain when love is not reciprocated. Another version of her story can be found in the book Praying with Celtic Holy Women, by Mehan and Oliver.

Before going to sleep tonight, take a few moments to close your eyes, and with your imagination, encircle those close to you with warmth and love. If you are seeking a relationship, feel your heart open as you appreciate the goodness and love you already have in your life. And pay attention to your dreams.