Spiritual sustenance, naturally.

In doing some research on why the Christian holiday of Easter has that name, I found this information from Wikipedia:

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ostara (1884) by Johannes Gehrts. The goddess flies through the heavens surrounded by Roman-inspired putti, beams of light, and animals. Germanic people look up at the goddess from the realm below.

Ostara

Old English Ēostre (also Ēastre) and Old High German Ôstarâ are the names of a putative Germanic goddess whose Anglo-Saxon month, Ēostur-monath, has given its name to the Christian festival of Easter. Eostre is attested only by Bede, in his 8th century work De temporum ratione, where he states that Ēostur-monath was the equivalent to the month of April, and that feasts held in her honor during Ēostur-monath had died out by the time of his writing, replaced by the “Paschal month.” The possibility of a Common Germanic goddess called *Austrōn-, reflecting the name of the Proto-Indo-European goddess of the dawn, was examined in detail in 19th century Germanic philology, by Jacob Grimm and others, without coming to a definite conclusion.  Subsequently scholars have discussed whether or not Eostra is an invention of Bede’s, and produced theories connecting Eostra with records of Germanic Easter customs (including hares and eggs).

[Jacob] Grimm notes that in the Old Norse Prose Edda book Gylfaginning, a male being by the name of Austri is attested, who Grimm describes as a “spirit of light.” Grimm comments that a female version would have been Austra, yet that the High German and Saxon tribes seem to have only formed Ostarâ and Eástre, feminine, and not Ostaro and Eástra, masculine. Grimm additionally speculates on the nature of the goddess and surviving folk customs that may have been associated with her in Germany:

Ostara, Eástre seems therefore to have been the divinity of the radiant dawn, of upspringing light, a spectacle that brings joy and blessing, whose meaning could be easily adapted by the resurrection-day of the christian’s God. Bonfires were lighted at Easter and according to popular belief of long standing, the moment the sun rises on Easter Sunday morning, he gives three joyful leaps, he dances for joy […]. Water drawn on the Easter morning is, like that at Christmas, holy and healing […]; here also heathen notions seems to have grafted themselves on great christian festivals. Maidens clothed in white, who at Easter, at the season of returning spring, show themselves in clefts of the rock and on mountains, are suggestive of the ancient goddess […].[11]

Eástre

Citing folk Easter customs in Leicestershire, England where “the profits of the land called Harecrop Leys were applied to providing a meal which was thrown on the ground at the “Hare-pie Bank,” late 19th century scholar Charles Isaac Elton says that these customs were likely connected with the worship of Ēostre.[12] In his late 19th century study of the Hare in folk custom and mythology, Charles J. Billson cites numerous incidents of folk custom involving the hare around the period of Easter in Northern Europe. Billson says that “whether there was a goddess named Eostre, or not, and whatever connection the hare may have had with the ritual of Saxon or British worship, there are good grounds for believing that the sacredness of this animal reaches back into an age still more remote, where it is probably a very important part of the great Spring Festival of the prehistoric inhabitants of this island.”[7]

The Resurrection Day

So, when Christianity arrived on the scene, what could be more natural than associating the celebration of the Risen Son with the festivals of the Risen Sun? In past years, each Easter Sunday morning a church member has opened her home in the pre-dawn hours for a sunrise service. And we still incorporate bunnies and eggs into this holiday. Religions are organic in their own ways, growing and changing, absorbing elements from lands and peoples along the way.

I am left wondering what Easter will look like in one hundred (or one thousand) years.

Comments on: "Easter, Ostara, Bunnies, and Eggs" (4)

  1. Very interesting! I do wonder about this comment – “here also heathen notions seems to have grafted themselves on great christian festivals.” Wouldn’t the heathen “notions” have been there first so that it would seem to be the other way around – christian festivals incorporating already existing heathen beliefs?

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  2. Eggs and bunnies. . . so that’s how they got “absorbed” by Christianity. Also, the rising sun. I like this version. It doesn’t take away anything from Christian beliefs, as far as I can tell.

    The more the merrier to celebrate for different reasons. April. Eastre. Maidens clothed in white like goddesses.

    michael j

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